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Entrepreneurship

Making Things Happen with Apple Crider

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What made you decide to choose this career path?

 

Ever since I saw my mom speak on stage for the first time when I was 14, I always knew that I wanted to spread a message to other people. At that time I had no idea what my message was though so I knew I had to take some time to learn and to develop my ideas and hone in on what was actually important to me and what I wanted to do with my life. Over time, as I learned more about what I enjoyed doing and what I was passionate about, I always had this idea in the back of my mind that I wanted to share a message with other people. At the age of 18 I took action on this desire for the first time when I started my YouTube channel. Through creating daily videos, I began to tell other people about what I was doing as an 18 year old when it came to personal finance. Money had always been something that fascinated me and I’d always been interested in how people interacted with money and the role that money played in our lives, so I decided to make videos documenting my process building good financial habits at a young age. I really enjoyed this process but eventually realized that my passion was not about personal finance. It was instead about empowering young people to create a life that made them feel fulfilled. At first I had honed in on personal finance because I noticed how important it was for young people to think about their financial situation so they could establish good habits for the rest of their lives.

However, as I learned more about the world in entrepreneurship I realized that I could be sharing a more powerful message than just teaching young people how to improve their personal finances. I also realized that as a 18 year old, I really only had so much life experience that I could be sharing with people around me. I wanted to create a platform where other people could teach young entrepreneurs what they had learned through building businesses that were much farther along and more developed than mine. This is why I started podcasting and interviewing successful entrepreneurs on my show called Young Smart Money. I saw the value they could provide to my audience, and I saw that they had so many experiences that I just didn’t. Through the process of podcasting, I was able to hone in on my larger goal which is to empower 100,000 young people to create a life that makes them feel fulfilled and excited every single day. As of right now I am pursuing that goal through podcasting and to public speaking, however I’m not particularly attached to these platforms. If I come across a better way to pursue my goal I will not hesitate to jump on that because podcasting, public speaking, and social media are simply means for me to achieve this goal and tools in my toolbox that I can utilize to move closer to this goal. Building a following online, or growing a podcast are simply means to an end of impacting 100,000 young people. When I looked at Corporate America and working a nine-to-five job, I didn’t see that same potential impact people in the way that I could if I went out and started spreading my message through my own avenues. For me, entrepreneurship isn’t so much about the income, it’s about the impact that I can have on other people and that is what has drawn me to what I do now.

 

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

 

So when I was getting started podcasting I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, I actually didn’t even know the podcast was until I decided that I wanted to start one. So going into this, I had absolutely no idea what I wanted to do with my podcast. All I knew is that podcasting was new, trendy, and it was a good way to reach people. Because I had no experience podcasting I didn’t really know what kind of preparation I need to do before sitting down and recording my first podcast. I decided to do all of the preparation. For my first podcast I wrote out a 40-page document outlining word-for-word what I was going to say. We are talking about 40 pages of dense text in a Google doc on my computer that I spent hours painstakingly writing out. I decided to repeat the same process for the next three episodes as well, so when I went to record for the first time I had four different 40-page Google Documents about the different topics I wanted to cover. Essentially I had written an entire book just to record four podcasts. From there, I went into a recording booth, pulled up my ridiculously long documents, and proceeded to read them word for word in this booth. Each one took me close to an hour to read and by the time I finished reading the first one I was extremely drained. I proceeded to sit in this booth reading all four of these documents for about four hours to record my first four podcasts.

I can tell you now looking back at these but they were absolutely horrendous. I still leave them up and published just to show people that your first podcasts are always your worst podcasts. They were extremely dry, I sounded like a robot, there was no emotion, and can only be described as unpleasant to listen to. Eventually I realized that I could have a much larger impact with my podcast if I decided to interview other people and that interviewing others would not require me to write out a 40-page document (yes please!).

The biggest takeaway that I had from this though is that you really just need to start, and once you do start you’re going to be able to see where you can improve, the things that you want to change, and how you can start making things better. But a lot of that’s not going to be clear until you actually start doing something because until you start doing you can assume and try to predict how it’s going to go, but you’re never going to actually know what’s going to happen until you do it. So even though I don’t think I would recommend writing out a 40-page document for each podcast episode you do, I think the most important thing is just to get started in whatever way, shape, or form you can. Don’t worry about things being perfect the first time because they won’t be. Just worried about things being done and about you being able to learn from doing and make your next at bat better than your last at bat.

 

What do you think makes your company/personal brand stand out?

 

In any business that you start or any project that you work on, it’s been important to have things that set you apart from everyone else. If you try to be the next Gary Vaynerchuk or the next Grant Cardone, you’re likely not going to have much success with that because they’ve been being Gary Vaynerchuk and Grant Cardone for decades. They’ve amassed millions of followers, have extremely loyal tribes, and you’re not likely to really have an impact on that. A mentor of mine once told me that “your vibe builds your tribe” and I think that’s extremely true and something that I have been able to lean into very heavily from my time building my company in my personal brand. There aren’t many other 20 year olds out there with blue hair, wearing colorful bandanas, and whose name is also a fruit. Beyond the superficial things that set me apart from most of the other people out there, I find it extremely important to have a strong why and a strong vision behind everything that I’m doing. With my podcast for example when I’m reaching out to potential guests that I want to have on the show, if I can show them that I’m extremely passionate about what I am doing and that I really care about the people that I’m serving, they’re so much more likely to be willing to come on the podcast then if it was clear that I did not have a strong vision or care about what I was doing. When people can tell that you’re genuine and really are in it to help other people out and not just help yourself out, it’s a lot easier to achieve your goals. Most people’s BS meter is pretty good and even if you’ve been able to trick yourself into believing that you’re in it for other people, you will have a hard time tricking other people.

I see so many young people getting started with entrepreneurship whether that be through social media marketing, or dropshipping, or content creation, because they see other people making money online doing that thing and they want to start making money online doing that thing. That’s not where I’m coming from. And that’s not where the 150+ successful entrepreneurs that I have interviewed on my podcast are coming from either. I use my podcast as a tool to study successful people and to allow them to share their stories with others. Through those stories, one of the things that I find time and time again is that the people who feel fulfilled, and the people who have success in the things that they do, are not motivated by helping themselves, they’re motivated by their ability to help other people. So many people get into entrepreneurship for selfish reasons and most of the time those are the people wind up failing quite quickly. If you don’t have a strong vision and you aren’t impacting other people, it’s going to be really difficult for you to continue moving forward when you’re faced with some of the setbacks and struggles that all entrepreneurs are faced with. Being able to bring yourself back to a larger why and seeing the people that you’re impacting is extremely powerful in setting yourself apart from everyone else and really building a name and a personal brand for yourself.

 

What’s a quote that you live by?

 

“There are three types of people in this world. Firstly, there are people who make things happen. Then there are people who watch things happen. Lastly, there are people who ask, what happened? Which do you want to be?” This quote resonates strongly with me and is something that I come back to quite frequently whenever I’m thinking about what my role is in any project or business that I am working on. From what I’ve observed in my life, the distribution is roughly 1% of people who are making things happen, 9% of people who are watching things happen, and 90% of people we’re asking “what happened?” Personally, I prefer to spend most of my time in the making things happen category and the watching things happen category because this is where growth happens.

When you make things happen you’re creating content, you are building something that can help other people, you are impacting the world in some way by bringing something new into it. When you’re watching things happen you’re studying success. You’re learning from people who have done the things that you want to do and finding ways that you can implement the things that they have done into your own life. You’re learning from mentors in-person, by reading books, from podcasts, and really anywhere you can find them. When you’re asking “what happened?” you’re moving through life oblivious to much of what’s happening around you. You’re not observing the subtitles and nuances around you, or thinking about how you can apply the findings of someone else into your own life, or what you can be doing to ensure that you are seeing consistent growth in the aspects of your life that are important to you. This is an area that I spend very little time in because is where I see the least amount of growth in what I’m doing, and provides me with the least insight for how I can move forward more effectively with whatever I’m trying to achieve. In order to stay in the first two categories, I consistently ask myself the question “what am I doing right now?” Am I creating? Am I consuming? Or am I wandering? By reflecting on the answer to this question and finding my patterns that lead me to wondering, I’m able to ensure that I spend as much time as possible in the prior to categories and continue to move towards my goals in the places that I want to be.

 

Apple Crider 

Nathan Ray Ortega is the founder of influencer podcasts. Nathan helps those share their great story, by helping entrepreneurs, authors, influencers, millionaires and many more get on podcasts and tv shows around the world, his passion is to help share the stories of the few to impact the lives of the many. Nathan had to overcome many obstacles during his journey, from having 16 different jobs at age 20 to being homeless and sleeping in a car with his pregnant girlfriend, and even changing in public bathrooms for 2 months, but during that time Nathan stayed motivated and listened to many powerful stories that changed his life for the better. Nathan thanks the power of podcasting for motivating him to push further with every episode of entrepreneurship. ''Life is never a straight road, we have to face unknown obstacles, many emotional experiences, and life-changing habits, to get to where we need to be.'' - Nathan Ray Ortega

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Entrepreneurship

How a Kid Selling Lemonade Turned His Entrepreneurial Habits Into A Lifestyle

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When you observe a major corporation, you most likely see the logo, the product or service they sell, or their marketing ploy. Take Apple, for instance. The iPhone, the MacBook, the classic minimalist design of their storefronts, or their iOS software are the first things that come to mind when the company is brought up. For Henry Westbrooks, he sees the innovator, or the Steve Jobs, behind the creation of the brand. Henry is fascinated by the concept that being an entrepreneur puts power in your hands as the creator. His fascination has lead him to multiple ventures in the business world, and has become massively successful as a result. 

Henry is a licensed realtor in Southwest Florida, the founder of iGrowClub, a digital marketing agency focused on helping clients grow organically on social media to reach their target audience and scale, and is the founder of the Health & Wealth Show, a podcast that focuses on health, wealth, love, and happiness. He has even found success in e-commerce business models, and has affiliates earning between 6-8 figures using the model. His intangible skills include door to door sales, where he has generated millions as a solar energy consultant, high ticket selling, and turning people into repeat customers through building value and pitching products. Henry is without a doubt a well rounded, dedicated entrepreneur who is making waves in the industry. But, Henry’s passion and dedication to making his own way in the business world is nothing new. 

As a child, Henry was already dedicated to selling and working for himself. During his school years, he would sell lemonade and Pokemon cards at a roadside table, host garage sales, and sell food or magazines whenever he could to make money. He was fascinated by seeing money stack up, and has always aspired to becoming wealthy and successful.

His actions speak louder than his words when it comes to Henry’s dedication. After graduating from the University of Buffalo with a BA in Communication and working for corporate radio, Henry was all in on following his passions and becoming successful. He drove from New York to Florida to start his real estate venture right after obtaining his real estate license. After getting involved in the real estate game, he was presented with an opportunity to sell solar across the country in California. Without hesitation, he accepted the offer, packed his things, and drove cross country to take advantage of the opportunity. 

On top of dominating the solar industry, Henry has grown a stellar personal brand and helps brands and companies grow their brands by helping them to identify their mission statements, handle the marketing, and helping with brand development. But, like all successful endeavors, Henry is cognizant of the slow process necessary to gain traction and momentum. He’s very open to detailing the processes he’s gone through to reach his level of success. 

Henry knows that the path to success happens one day at a time. There have been many early mornings and late nights, sacrifice, failures, and changes in his mindset. Finding success as an entrepreneur requires a ton of effort, patience, and grit, and Henry possesses all of those attributes, and his work ethic and drive has allowed him to work at his goals day in and day out to find success in his businesses. The reward of building something that not only generates revenue but helps people is well worth the early days of uncertainty, Henry says. A massive key is maintaining faith in the baby stages of a company, as your big break could come just a few days after you feel like quitting but decide to keep pushing forward.

Today, Henry has a massive amount of knowledge and the skills necessary to be successful. But, starting out, he wished he knew two key pieces of advice: Invest in yourself, and be aware that it all starts with you. You need to take on good debt that results in cash flow, believe in yourself, make daily progress, and trust the long term process. Anyone can become successful once they acquire the right mindset and work ethic, and no one believes in that idea more than Henry. 

Henry can be reached on Instagram @henryaaronwestbrooks, or via email, [email protected]

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Entrepreneurship

Kathy Chou Founder and CEO of Selfkaire is Making Waves in The Beauty Industry

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Kathy Chou is the founder and CEO of Selfkaire, a beauty company that’s focused on modernizing the most effective Eastern medicine concepts in order to replace outdated tools and methods. The idea for Selfkaire came after Kathy began to experience health problems from working 80-100+ hours a week as an investment banker at Citigroup. She had developed severe lymphedema in her legs, constant lung infections, and sickness from eating everything outside of a piece of lettuce.

After meeting with her doctors and not finding a solution to these problems she decided to see her family’s Eastern medicine practitioner. That experience is what led her into 8 years of researching ancient Eastern medicine in order to create a beauty brand that only brings the most effective Eastern medicine concepts to market.

Research and Development

Kathy decided to shift from her lucrative finance career after her Wharton MBA to focus on Selfkaire. She now has a team that’s spent over ten years researching Eastern medicine and top practitioners in the industry in order to come up with products that are developed by world-class engineers who head R&D teams for the top global consumer product company in both aesthetics and design. Her vision is to disrupt and replace the expensive, invasive and dangerous in office procedures with natural and non-invasive solutions to heal the body from within. To learn why she uses surgical steel check out this article on freepeople.com

Eastern Medicine 

Eastern medicine is rooted in the belief that your systems and organs are interconnected, and your lymphatic system plays a core part in making sure everything is functioning — and detoxing — as it should. Those toxins you can’t process out get imbued into your deep tissue, and can potentially lead to the appearance of cellulite, stubborn fat, bulky muscles, swollen lymph. The Selfkaire tool efficiently processes toxins in the quickest manner possible. Selfkaire’s facial tool draw out toxins and expedites lymphatic drainage and blood circulation. From just one use, you may notice a flush in your skin (and soreness) — that shows it’s working! The best thing is, your body gives you feedback as you use the tool.

If you want to see what this tool can really do and bring in effective concepts that are innovating products that haven’t been touched in thousands of years, check out the following: 

Website: www.selfkaire.com  

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/selfkaire/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/takekaireffect/ 

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Entrepreneurship

Meet Lewis Fausett – The Superstar Operations and Marketing Consultant

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Recently, I had the pleasure of sitting down with Lewis Fausett for an interview. Lewis is a business manager and consultant and has had massive success in only a short period of time. We talk about how he got started, what he’s done differently, and more.

 

 

  • Hey Lewis, who are you and what do you do?

 

 

I’m Lewis Fausett, and I’m a business manager for Patrick Adair from Patrick Adair Designs. I am also a business consultant for a handful of other influencers. I spend most of my time making sure people are making the correct decisions to optimize growth not just of their brands but their businesses behind the brands. This means I spend a lot of time overseeing marketing and operations on top of the traditional things like advising on contracts and big deals. 

 

 

  • What have you done differently to scale your business?

 


The biggest thing is being able to blend the traditional world of business with the more personal aspects of being an influencer. Most influencers are focused on just creating amazing content and putting minimal effort into creating the brands and businesses behind the scenes. I spend the majority of my time implementing more traditional marketing aspects and operational flows into influencer based businesses while still letting the influencer be themselves.


Good examples of this occur with Patrick Adair Designs. We often have to blend Patrick’s love of traditional YouTube culture and memes with the fact that his biggest brand is selling luxury jewelry as a designer. This means we have to connect with multiple demographics. Your consumer who frequents Saks Fifth Avenue (this would be a more traditional demographic) is very different from a 25-year-old watching a video because it involves PewDiePie.

The other big blend we do involves including more traditional marketing. You’re seeing this more and more with larger influencers, but the middle tier still leaves this untapped. Incorporating things like paid strategies and lead capturing and nurturing strategies also has really helped. The key is you have to do this all very carefully to ensure that you aren’t alienating your core organic viewers. 

 

 

  • What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned along your journey?

 

 

I think the biggest lesson I’ve learned is that connecting with an audience is the most important thing. It doesn’t matter if you’re trying to get views on a video, promote a song, or sell a product. If you can get an audience to connect and trust you, you can get away with sucking at every aspect of traditional marketing. Then if you’re able to do those well you get to a point where you are almost invincible in your respective industries. 

 

 

  • What are your three core principles?

 

 

  1. Winning is a culture

 

This was a phrase that got thrown around a lot while I was playing rugby at the University of Utah. You don’t win games against top teams by just showing up on Saturday night. You have to hit the weight room all week, be attentive in practice, and taking care of all your off the field responsibilities. This translates directly to being successful in life and business. If you just strive for excellence in everything, it’s much easier to strive for excellence at work. 

 

  1. Innovate or die

 

You’re never going to be able to do the same thing forever and be successful. You’re only going to have a limited amount of success before people start trying to copy your formula. At that point you need to already be figuring out the next step, so you’re always a step ahead. We see this a lot with competitors trying to rip off designs and naming schemes for jewelry.

    3. Outwork Everyone

 

This is another one that came from sports that I think laid the foundation for success in business. At the end of the junior year of high school rugby, I was a solid second-string player on a fairly bad team in a really good conference. My coach sat me down and told me that because I had really good grades, test scores, and measurables (height, weight, etc.) a lot of ivy league programs he was connected to were interested in me, but they’d need to see me play at a high level first. One of those coaches was the coach for the collegiate all American program. He sent me an email with a weight program and recommendations for conditioning and diets. Between his advice and one on one skill work by showing up to practice early and staying late with my coaching staff, I finished my senior season as an all-conference player. I actually didn’t get into any of the ivy league schools, but in the process, I got to the point where I was recruited to play for the University of Utah which at the time was ranked in the top 10 teams in collegiate rugby. That experience cemented that if your willing to outwork everyone you can do almost anything.

When I started working, I took that same idea into it. There were plenty of days where I’d work 18 hours and sleep on the couch at work to make sure I was there when the day started again.

 

 

  • What advice would you give to someone looking to become an entrepreneur?

 

 

I think I’d give the advice that you need to develop a skill set that’s valuable. I mean I think being an entrepreneur can be a little silly if you have no product or ideas, but if you have a high-value skill set, you can always be an entrepreneur. It can be sales, social media, marketing, design, etc, but if you can do something that most people can’t, then you just have to sell yourself.

That’s why I’m not necessarily pro college or anti college. You definitely need a valuable skill set, and I think you can learn one in college. The networking is also good. At the same time, you can go learn something on your own and practice it. I mean you could even just learn business operations by mowing lawns and trying to scale a landscaping business. The biggest thing is to just start trying to create a valuable skill set that will help you in the future. 

 

 

  • What are your future plans?

 

The goal is to just keep growing the businesses and brands until they reach their market cap for the effort that is available from everyone. 

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